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Published in Primary Care

Expert Opinion / My Approach · January 09, 2017

MY APPROACH to Osteoporosis

Written by
Naiomi Jamal MD

 

Additional Info

  1. Does osteoporosis run in your family? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Updated May 16, 2016. Accessed November 13, 2016.
  2. Curtis EM, Moon RJ, Dennison EM, et al. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and treatment of osteoporosis. Clin Med. 2015;15(Suppl 6):s92-s96.
  3. Bone Health and Osteoporosis: A Report of the Surgeon General. Office of the Surgeon General (US), eds. Rockville, MD: Office of the Surgeon General (US); 2004.
  4. US Department of Health and Human Services. HCUPnet. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Rockville, MD; 2012.
  5. Parkkari J, Kannus P, Palvanen M, et al. Majority of hip fractures occur as a result of a fall and impact on the greater trochanter of the femur: a prospective controlled hip fracture study with 206 consecutive patients. Calcif Tissue Int. 1999;65(3):183-187.
  6. Blume SW, Curtis JR. Medical costs of osteoporosis in elderly Medicare population. Osteoporos Int. 2011;22(6):1835-1844.
  7. Burge R, Dawson-Hughes B, Solomon DH, et al. Incidence and economic burden of osteoporosis related fractures in the United States, 2005–2025. J Bone Miner Res. 2007;22(3):465-475.
  8. US Preventive Services Task Force. Final Recommendation Statement: Fall Prevention in Older Adults: Counseling and Preventive Medication. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2012.
  9. US Department of Health and Human Services. 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Rockville, MD: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; 2008.
  10. Cosman F, de Beur SJ, LeBoff MS, et al. Clinician’s Guide to Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis. Osteoporos Int. 2014;25(10):2359-2381.
  11. United States Department of Agriculture. SuperTracker: My foods. My fitness. My health. USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion: Alexandria, VA. Updated January 5, 2017. Accessed January 5, 2017.
  12. United States Department of Agriculture. Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 1997.
  13. Jackson RD, LaCroix AZ, Gass M, et al. Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and the risk of fractures. N Engl J Med. 2006;354(7):669-683.
  14. Prentice RL, Pettinger MB, Jackson RD, et al. Health risks and benefits from calcium and vitamin D supplementation: Women’s Health Initiative clinical trial and cohort study. Osteoporos Int. 2013;24(2):567-580.
  15. Reid IR, Bolland MJ. Calcium supplements: bad for the heart? Heart. 2012;98(12):895-896.
  16. Bolland MJ, Grey A, Avenell A, et al. Calcium supplements with or without vitamin D and risk of cardiovascular events: reanalysis of the Women’s Health Initiative limited access dataset and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2011;342:d2040.
  17. Moyer VA. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation to prevent fractures in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med. 2013;158(9):691-696.
  18. US Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. STEADI: Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths and Injuries. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Atlanta, GA; Updated September 22, 2016. Accessed January 5, 2017.
  19. US Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for osteoporosis: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Int Med. 2011;154(5):356-364.
  20. US Preventive Services Task Force. Evidence Summary: Other Supporting Document for Osteoporosis: Screening. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2014.
  21. Kanis JA. FRAX: Fracture Risk Assessment Tool. Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield: Sheffield, UK; 2016.

Further Reading