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Tracy Frech MD, MS

Tracy M. Frech MD, MS

Associate Professor, Rheumatology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee

Dr. Tracy Frech is dedicated to teaching medical students, residents, and fellows in clinic, as well as through their research projects, with an aim to develop the next generation of academic rheumatologists dedicated to clinical and research excellence and compassionate health care delivery. Dr. Frech’s primary goal in research and clinical care is early diagnosis and effective health care delivery to the systemic sclerosis (SSc) patient population. Her specific research interest is to better understand the natural history of symptomatic vasculopathy in SSc. She directs the SSc program at Vanderbilt University Medical Center with interdisciplinary teams in pulmonology, nephrology, and dermatology. Through national and international collaborations with Prospective Registry of Early Systemic Sclerosis (PRESS), the INception SYstemic Sclerosis Cohort (INSYNC), the Collaborative Quality and Efficacy National Registry (CONQUER) for SSc, and the Utah Vascular Research Laboratory (UVRL), Dr. Frech’s academic career is focused on improvements in diagnosis and treatment of SSc through meticulous patient phenotyping.

Disclosures

No disclosures reported.

Recent Contributions to PracticeUpdate:

  1. Improving Medication Adherence in Systemic Sclerosis