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Shunichi Homma

Shunichi Homma MD

Margaret Milliken Hatch Professor of Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center; Deputy Chief of Cardiology Division; Director of Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging

Dr. Homma is the Margaret Milliken Hatch Professor of Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center, where he serves as the Deputy Chief of Cardiology Division and the Director of Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  He completed internal medicine residency at the Montefiore Medical Center, and cardiology fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital and Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.

Dr. Homma has been a founding board member of AHA Heritage affiliate, American Society of Echocardiography, and serves or has served on various guideline committees including those for American Academy of Neurology, American Society of Echocardiography and European Heart Failure Society. He is credited with publishing over 300 full length manuscripts and has been continuously funded by NIH since 1989. His research interests center around echocardiographically detected embolic risk factors and treatment strategies for these findings. Dr. Homma has published extensively on such risk factors as PFO, aortic plaque and valvular strands.

Disclosures

St. Jude Medical – Member DSMB, RESPECT Trial

Recent Contributions to PracticeUpdate:

  1. Recurrent Stroke and Patent Foramen Ovale