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Keith Flaherty

Keith T Flaherty MD

Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director, Henri and Belinda Termeer Center for Targeted Therapies, Mass General Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

Dr. Flaherty is director of the Henri and Belinda Termeer Center for Targeted Therapies at the Mass General Cancer Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Flaherty’s research and clinical focus is therapies for melanoma, with a particular expertise in targeted therapies.

Dr. Flaherty obtained his undergraduate degree from Yale University in 1993 and an MD from Johns Hopkins University in 1997. He completed his internship in medicine, followed by a residency in medicine, at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (Harvard Medical School) in Boston. He went on to complete a fellowship in Medical Oncology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

He has been the principal investigator of many clinical trials, including first-in-human trials of novel targeted therapies, and two NCI cooperative group trials. He has authored more than 150 research articles, abstracts and reviews in the peer-reviewed literature; including 3 first-author New England Journal of Medicine papers. He serves as a senior editor for Clinical Cancer Research and a member of the editorial boards for Cancer Discovery, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer, and Pigment Cell and Melanoma Biology.