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Josef Neu

Josef Neu MD

Professor and Co-Director, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship Program, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Dr. Josef Neu, MD, did his medical school training at the University of Wisconsin, was a pediatric resident at Johns Hopkins and a postdoctoral neonatology fellow at Stanford University. He came to the University of Florida as an associate professor in 1984 to continue his research in developmental gastroenterology and neonatal biochemical nutrition. In 1987 he pursued additional research training at the University of Bern (Switzerland) on basic mechanisms affecting intracellular processing of lactase in the intestinal epithelium. He is internationally recognized for his research in developmental gastroenterology and nutrition and has most recently focused his research efforts on the intestinal microbiome and mucosal immunology. He has been NIH RO-1 funded to study the developing microbiome in babies at risk for developing necrotizing enterocolitis. This involved a multicenter evaluation of intestinal microbiota using novel non-culture-based technologies. He is also evaluating the effects of the fetal microbiome as it relates to prematurity and evaluating the effects of antibiotics on multiomics in preterm neonates.

Disclosures

Dr. Neu is the PI of a multicenter trial evaluating use of a microbial agent in preterm infants sponsored by Infant Bacterial Therapeutics.