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Jane Reusch MD

Jane E. B. Reusch MD

Professor of Medicine and Physiology and Associate Director of Ludeman Family Center for Women’s Health Research, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine Anschutz Medical Campus; VA Staff Physician and Merit Scientist, Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center, Aurora, Colorado

Jane E. B. Reusch, MD, is a Professor of Medicine, Bioengineering and Integrative Physiology, and Associate Director of the Center for Women’s Health Research, Co-Director of the UC NIH Diabetes Research Center, Anschutz Medical Campus and staff physician and merit investigator at the Rocky Mountain Regional VAMC. She is an elected member of American Society for Clinical Investigation, American Association of Physicians, American Diabetes Association 2018 President for Medicine and Science and Fellow of the American Heart Association. She is currently working with the ADA, AHA and ACC on global strategies to decrease the cardiovascular burden of diabetes. She is dedicated to recruiting and mentoring the translational research workforce, especially in women’s health and diabetes. She was just informed that she has been named the Endocrine Society Laureate Award winner for Mentorship-a tribute to the LCWHR.

A physician-scientist, Dr. Reusch has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of cellular metabolism of diabetes and its complications. The focus of her basic science program is to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms (i.e. mitochondrial dysfunction and vascular inflexibility) that contribute to cardiac, vascular, and skeletal muscle dysfunction in diabetes.  Her shared clinical translational research program with Drs Judy Regensteiner and Kristen Nadeau examines and targets the biological variables in people with diabetes, particularly women, that lead to decreased functional exercise capacity, insulin resistance and shortened lifespan.

Recent Contributions to PracticeUpdate:

  1. Early Menopause and CVD Risk in T2D