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Foluso Ogunsile

Foluso J. Ogunsile MD

Assistant Professor, Clinical Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
Dr. Ogunsile is a benign hematologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She completed her hematology fellowship at Johns Hopkins University. She did her B.S. in Biology with a Minor in African American Studies from Duke University, and then served as a Research Assistant at the National Institute of Health, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. She completed her M.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and her residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics from Vanderbilt University Hospital. Dr. Ogunsile’s clinical interests are in the care of patients with sickle cell disease and non-malignant hematological disorders. With her background in internal medicine and pediatrics she is ideally suited for overseeing the transition of pediatric patients into adult care. As a physician scientist, her research interests are to improve therapeutic decision making and outcomes for patients with sickle cell disease, with a current focus on understanding factors that influence cardiovascular outcomes, body composition physical activity in patients with sickle cell disease.

Disclosures

Dr. Ogunsile reports the following:
  • Global Blood Therapeutics (Speaker Presentations)
  • Novartis (Speaker Presentations)

Recent Contributions to PracticeUpdate:

  1. Voxelotor in Adolescents and Adults With Sickle Cell Disease