We have detected that you are using an Ad Blocker.
PracticeUpdate is free to end users but we rely on advertising to fund our site. Please consider supporting PracticeUpdate by whitelisting us in your ad blocker.
We have sent a message to the email address you have provided, . If this email is not correct, please update your settings with your correct address.
The email address you provided during registration, , does not appear to be valid. Please update your settings with a valid address before to continue using PracticeUpdate.
Please provide your AHPRA Number to ensure that you are given the correct level of access to our site.
Denis Sasseville MD, FRCPC

Denis Sasseville MD, FRCPC

Professor, Division of Dermatology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Dr. Denis Sasseville completed medical school at Université Laval (Québec City) in 1972 and practiced general medicine until 1976, when he returned to residency training in dermatology at McGill University in Montréal. After 9 years as solo dermatologist in Rivière-du-Loup, Québec, he returned to McGill and the Royal Victoria Hospital in 1989 to develop the contact dermatitis clinic. Professor of medicine at McGill University, he was director of the division of dermatology of the McGill University Health Centre from 2000 to 2011. He retired from clinical practice in July 2020 but is still active in the division of experimental medicine.

Dr. Sasseville is founding member and first president of the Canadian Contact Dermatitis Society. A member of the American Contact Dermatitis Society since 1991, he was its vice-president from 2005 to 2009. He joined the European Society of Contact Dermatitis and three research groups in cutaneous allergy: the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) in 2000, the Groupe d’Etudes et de Recherche en Dermato-Allergologie (GERDA) in 2003, and the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICRDG) in 2005. He has authored or co-authored over 275 articles and 29 book chapters, mostly in the field of contact dermatitis or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.